Friday, December 9, 2011

Preparedness is Next to Godliness

A colossal determinant in prolonged success is the ability to stay out of your own way.  As far as shooting yourself in the foot is concerned, Herman Cain may as well have been at the controls of a computer-guided missile zeroed in on his own wingtips.  After dodging numerous tripwires in the form of sexual harassment accusations, his presidential campaign was driven into the proverbial ditch amidst extra-marital affair allegations.  With enough loose ends to construct a ropes course, Cain was ill-prepared for such a lofty venture as running for the highest office in the United States.  As far as PR is concerned: bookmark Herman Cain’s campaign as a prime example of what NOT to do.

In the Bible of public relations, preparedness is next to Godliness.  There is no use investing your time, money, sweat, and tears into an undertaking to be the arbiter of your own unraveling.  Fools rush in might be the appropriate adage.  Cain’s misstep was not properly evaluating every aspect of his own life (including what appears to be a Himalayan-sized hamper of dirty laundry) before throwing his hat into the ring, the outcome of which has resulted in his public political undoing.

Prior to embarking on any endeavor, brace yourself for the possibility that it skyrockets.  Sudden, overwhelming success can make unintentional martyrs of the unprepared.  When your name or business gains household notoriety, so do the crumbs and scraps you’d rather leave under the rug.  Keep your damage-control PR at an absolute minimum so you can focus on newfound success and longevity.

The bell has tolled on Herman Cain’s presidential aspirations, but by vetting yourself and your constituents you can avoid paralleling this slow and embarrassing descent.  With a concise level of preparation there should be no surprises or curveballs to impede your pathway toward success.  Do not become the pilot of your own corporate kamikaze; preparedness can keep you flying high.

-Carter Breazeale

PR/PR Public Relations